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History of International Law

Head of Section:

Anne Peters

 

Publications

  • Bardo Fassbender, Anne Peters (eds.): Oxford Handbook of the History of International Law. Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2012 , 1228 p.. paperback edition: July 2014
  • Mentioned as one of the "International Law's 'Must Reads' from the Past Decade" in Opinio Juris, 15 January 2015

    http://opiniojuris.org/2015/01/15/international-laws-must-reads-past-decade/

     "The Oxford Handbook of the History of International Law (Bardo Fassbender and Anne Peters, eds) (Oxford 2012). A deep Survey of the history of international law in and across countries and cultures. It goes beyond international legal history as European history and widens the Focus to encompass comparative legal histories and how different international legal traditions encounter and interact with each other. Plus a section of legal biographies. A fascinating and much-needed resource."

    Chris Borgen

    Reviewed by

  • Priemel, Kim Christian: Rezension zu 'The Oxford Handbook of the History of International Law'. In: Kommunikation und Fachinformation für die Geschichtswissenschaften, 11.08.2015. Priemel_Rezension.pdf (PDF, 78.2 KB)
  • Burbank, Jane: Review: The Oxford Handbook of the History of International Law. In: Law and History Review 33, 263-266 (2015).
  • Katz Cogan, Jacob: Review:The Oxford Handbook of the History of International Law. In: AJIL 108, 371-376 (2014).
  • Steiger, Heinhard: Von einer eurozentrischen zu einer globalen Völkerrechtsgeschichte? In: Der Staat 53, 121-137 (2014). Von einer eurozentrischen zu einer globalen Völkerrechtsgeschichte? (PDF, 5443.3 KB)
  • Kemmerer, Alexandra: Towards a Global History of International Law? In: EJIL 25, 287-295 (2014).
  • Parfitt, Rose: The Spectre of Sources. In: EJIL 25, 297-306 (2014).
  • Kirmse, Stefan B.: Sleepy Side Alleys, Dead Ends, and the Perpetuation of Eurocentrism. In: EJIL 25, 307-311 (2014).
  • Samour, Nahed: Is there a Role for Islamic International Law in the History of International Law? In: EJIL 25, 313-319 (2014).
  • Hanley, Will: Statelessness: An Invisible Theme in the History of International Law. In: EJIL 25, 321-327 (2014).
  • Martineau, Anne-Charlotte: Overcoming Eurocentrism? Global History and the Oxford Handbook of the History of International Law. In: EJIL 25, 329-336 (2014).
  • Forji, Amin George: Review: The Oxford Handbook of the History of International Law. In: Journal of the History of International Law 16, 83-110 (2014). Forji, Review, Handbook of the History of International Law, JHIL 16 (2014) 83-110 (PDF, 84.1 KB)
  • Ziegler, Karl-Heinz: Review: The Oxford Handbook of the History of International Law. In: GYIL 56, 613-616 (2013).
  • 2014 ASIL Book Award: Certificate of Merit in a Specialized Area of International Law:

    Bardo Fassbender and Anne Peters eds., The Oxford Handbook of the History of International Law (Oxford University Press 2012).

    "The Oxford Handbook of the History of International Law innovatively and comprehensively provides a timely and ambitious global history of international law from the sixteenth century to the mid-twentieth century. Under the skilled editorship of Bardo Fassbender and Anne Peters, the contributors, experts who themselves come from all parts of the world, present a history that imagines international law as the product of different regions, cultures, actors, and eras. Setting a new agenda for the field, the Handbook will be the indispensable starting point for students and researchers exploring the history of international law."

    http://www.asil.org/blogs/2014-asil-book-awards-announced

     

    "The Eurocentric story of international law has proven wrong because it is highly incomplete. Not only does it generally blind out the violence, ruthlessness and arrogance which accompanied the dissemination of Western rules, and the destruction of other legal cultures in which that dissemination resulted. Like most other histories, this history of international law was a history of conquerors and victors, not of the victims. Further, the conventional story ignores too many other experiences and forms of legal relations between autonomous communities developed in the course of history. It even discards such extra-European experiences and forms which were discontinued as a result of domination and colonization by European Powers as irrelevant to a (continuing) history of international law. […]

    Global history no longer takes the nation state as the traditional object of historical analysis. Instead, to global historians, the major actors or subjects of a global history are movements (such as the peace movement, or women’s suffrage movement) and business (such as chartered companies). Interestingly, current international legal scholarship also focuses on non-state actors as emerging subjects of international law. Another objective of global history is to overcome the (primarily European) heritage of national history. Therefore, attention is directed to non-European societies and regions. Their modern history is understood as an autonomous development, and not as a mere reaction to European conquest. […]
    [S]tudying the history of international law can help better to understand the character of that particular legal order, its promise and its limits. If we are not mistaken, we live right now in a period of fundamental change of international relations, a process instigated by the collapse of the Soviet Union and the communist bloc of states, and the end of the Cold War. If the history of international law since the sixteenth century has been characterised by a global expansion of Western ideas, and with it of Western domination, many signs today suggest that this history is drawing to a close. To know, in this situation, a bit of the law of nations of the past can help to see the larger picture, and incite informed curiosity about how the history of international law will continue.” 

    (Extract from Bardo Fassbender and Anne Peters, “Introduction: Towards a Global History of International Law”, in: Bardo Fassbender/Anne Peters (eds), Oxford Handbook of the History of International Law (Oxford: Oxford University Press 2012), 1-24, internal references omitted)

  • Emmanuelle Tourme-Jouannet, Anne Peters: The Journal of the History of International Law: A Forum for New Research. In: Journal of the History of International Law 16, 1-8 (2014). Journal of the History of International Law The Journal of the History of International Law: A Forum for New Research (PDF, 84.2 KB)